Not Your Father’s Car Insurance: How Technology is Upending the Industry

Jeff Briglia is our Chief Insurance Officer.

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It’s no secret that mobility is on the cusp of a revolution. Increasingly, autonomous vehicles are transforming the role of the driver, just as ride- and car-sharing platforms are changing car ownership.

What’s less obvious is that these same technologies are also upending automobile insurance. If a car is driving itself half the time, or all of the time, should the driver be held liable for an accident that is caused when the vehicle is in autonomous mode? If a person travels mostly by ride-sharing, and uses her own car very little, shouldn’t she pay a lower premium?

That’s just the tip of the iceberg. An even bigger revolution is being driven by information technology — real-time driving data, or telematics, that makes it possible to know both how much and how safely each individual person (or car!) is driving. 

That promises to profoundly change the century-old approach for how insurers rate drivers for safety and how much they charge.  

Put simply, instead of lumping drivers into different risk-groups based on proxies for risk like age, education, and even gender, telematics makes it possible to rate drivers based primarily on their actual, individual driving practices. 

Done correctly, this will greatly increase fairness for consumers. Imagine this: one of the most expensive times to have auto insurance is when you have a teenage driver on your policy. Taken as a group, teens get into accidents at a much greater rate than adults. Today, your teen is assumed to drive like the average teen and, as a result, you pay for it. In the future, your teen driver’s insurance rate will be based on how she actually drives; not only is this a fairer way to price insurance but it also creates stronger accountability for people of all ages to drive more safely. 

Equally important, the new technology will enable insurers to recognize the kaleidoscope of new approaches to mobility. People who rely heavily on ride-sharing platforms, and only seldom drive their own cars, can now pay less because they drive fewer miles. 

We already have the fundamental technology. Metromile, which insures drivers based on the number of miles they drive and the quality of those miles, gives customers a device that plugs into the car’s diagnostic port and transmits a real-time stream of data about what’s happening. How many miles does each customer drive? Is any rapid acceleration or hard braking taking place? Is it a riskier time of day? Other technologies make it possible to spot signs of distracted driving or falling asleep at the wheel.

In fact, I can imagine a day when we don’t price at all on the basis of which risk-groups a person is in. If we have access to individual data and understand what it means, an extremely careful twenty-something millennial could end up paying less for car insurance than a 45-year-old Gen X’er  who appears shaky behind the wheel.

Telematics can also transform the way we, as insurers, interact with our customers. If we see signs of less-than-ideal driving practices, such as a lot of sudden accelerations and hard stops, we can gently advise them on ways to improve safety and get better mileage as well. If drivers know they may be rewarded for following better practices, and they are receiving concrete tips, they are likely to become safer drivers.  

Until recently, the biggest hurdle to this kind of personalized insurance has been knowing how to process all the incoming data. We’re talking about staggering amounts of data sent from millions of cars every minute of the day. Simply storing all that was a gargantuan task, and analyzing it was many times harder.

That has now changed. The plunging cost of computer processing power, and the explosive advances in artificial intelligence and “deep learning” computers, enable us to make sense out of what would have seemed like chaos just a few years ago.

To be sure, we have a ways to go.

For all the computing and algorithmic power at our fingertips, this is an entirely new approach to modeling driver safety. New approaches require new principles for risk analysis. The leaders in this new field will be companies that can both collect all that data and then actually learn the digital traits of safe drivers. Even after accomplishing all that, insurers will need to translate those risk-profiles into practical underwriting principles. 

It’s also important to acknowledge that insurance is a regulated industry, and most state regulators are still grounded in traditional group-based insurance models. We are already working with several states to test-drive new kinds of policies, but this is a learning process for them as well as for consumers.

Metromile is in a strong position here. Because we started from the ground up with a model based on individual driving rather than group patterns, we enjoy a big headstart in understanding almost every conceivable kind of driver in almost every conceivable situation. We have data on more than 2 billion miles of driving so far…and we’re still in the early stages.  

As a 20-year insurance industry vet, this is by far the most exciting time for innovation and improvement that I have ever experienced. 

We’re putting drivers back in the driver’s seat.

Hey Elon, Welcome to Insurance. As You’re Learning, it’s Complicated

Dan Preston is the CEO of Metromile.
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When Elon Musk announced that he was getting into car insurance, I wasn’t surprised — this is an industry full of opportunities for fresh thinking. I also wasn’t surprised he ran into some glitches on launch day.


I understand why Musk is frustrated: Tesla cars are packed with pioneering safety technology, but they are comparatively expensive to insure. We know firsthand; Metromile insures many Tesla owners (up 200% in the past year alone). Our data shows they are no more accident-prone than drivers of other cars, while their claims run about twice as much as other cars due to the high cost of repairing the on-board technology. 

From the expansion of autonomous navigation to the explosion of ride- and car-sharing platforms, technology is transforming both cars and car ownership. Insurance is ripe for disruption, too, which is why Metromile was founded eight years ago with a pay-per-mile model based on someone’s actual driving.

But drivers also value the service itself — beyond savings — whether that means a feature that monitors the car’s condition or an intuitive, design-first claims system. Consumers may be attracted to low prices, but how long they remain a customer depends on their experience.

The long-term opportunity lies in reducing the conflict and distrust between insurance companies and their customers. Right now, the relationship can be very transactional and full of tension. Insurers worry about risky drivers and fraudulent claims, while customers worry about being short-changed by obscure policy loopholes. It’s an adversarial process, and it can be grueling.

Technology offers massive opportunities for personalized insurance that can lower rates. We save many of our customers hundreds of dollars a year. Likewise, we recently partnered with Turo, a leading car-sharing company, to create fractional insurance to help reduce the costs of car ownership. 
And we’re on the cusp of even larger changes. Sooner or later, self-driving cars will become mainstream. As a result, cars will be safer and experience fewer accidents. While some accidents like a falling tree will happen no matter how advanced a car may be, we understand fundamentally that no two miles driven are the same; a mile driven autonomously could and should be insured differently than one driven by a human.

In the meantime, technology can reduce the tension between insurers and their customers. One way is by enabling personalized insurance customized to individual needs. Another is to make the claims process smoother and easier. Through AVA, our AI-powered claims system, we see the power of using a car’s telematics data to reconstruct an accident and assess the damage quickly — enabling us to pay some claims within minutes.   

That said, irresponsible technology can create traps. Just imagine how fast a fully-automated AI system could alienate customers by spitting out instant decisions they don’t like, or not being able to be guided by an experienced, empathetic claims-professional after a stressful accident. These are very nuanced issues; they require employees with exceptional insurance experience who can bring out the best of the technology while avoiding the roadside ditches.  

Without a doubt, I love Musk’s challenge to the status quo. But as Tesla pauses for an “algorithm update,” I hope they take my advice: insurance is about more than low prices. We need fresh thinking from carmakers and insurers alike.

What Will Transportation Look Like in 2019?

New year… new transportation methods? Since the days of Back to the Future, the world has been poised for flying and self-driving cars. If the future really is now, how are we doing on these futuristic transportation options and what other transportation methods are available to us now that can help us keep our mileage low?

long exposure photography of road and cars

Transportation Trends in 2019

2019 is here, people. Let’s look into the forms of alternative transportation available to us now, and in the future.

Autonomous Vehicles

Pretty much every big player in the auto industry is hard at work researching and developing an autonomous vehicle. Key players include Tesla and Alphabet/Waymo (the parent company of Google). Tesla is pushing for a vision-based system, with cameras positioned strategically around the vehicle taking in the 360º view of surroundings as the car moves. Alphabet/Waymo has a LIDAR system (Light Detection and Ranging) on their vehicles, which is a spinning apparatus on the top of the car that sends out lasers and measures how long it takes for them to bounce back – similar to how bats use echolocation! This system is able to definitively calculate the distance of objects and is much more accurate and reliable than a vision-based system. However, LIDAR does not work very well in fog, rain, or dust, due to its use of light wavelengths, and doesn’t distinguish color and contrast.

Other smaller (but still extensive) companies in the space are Uber and GM/Cruse. Fundamentally, all of these companies are focused on creating a system to identify other cars and obstacles on the road and developing the navigation necessary to make self-driving cars a reality.

Some states do not allow the testing of autonomous vehicles on the road – no surprises there! The state of California requires all companies testing self-driving technology to publish a Disengagement Report. This report details how many miles the self-driving system has driven in the state of CA and reports the number of times that the human driver has had to take over for the self-driving system. Given this (and the fact that many companies are wary of publishing this information), many are moving beyond the CA state lines and testing their technology elsewhere. Uber has a large deployment of self-driving tests being conducted in Phoenix, Arizona, and Tesla has been rumored to be testing their tech entirely on a simulator.

Tunnel-Transit

Elon Musk’s Hyperloop (LA) and Express Loop (Chicago) saw a lot of testing and speculation in 2018. Often criticized, tunnels are expensive to build and take a long time. Additionally, many city infrastructures wouldn’t be able to handle it. Innovative tunnel technologies and companies, such as Elon Musk’s The Boring Company, have a ways to go before they’re ready for universal adoption. We’re at least five years out from any of them coming to fruition.

Electric Scooters

Chances are if you live in or have been to a major city recently, you’ve seen electric scooters on every street corner. Across the country, more and more cities have been adopting electric scooters as another means of public transportation. Nowadays, there are so many companies offering them it’s hard to keep track.

In the pros category, electric scooters are easy and cheap transit for short distances. They work well on flat surfaces and are faster than walking to your destination. However, the cons include a lack of dedicated infrastructure, environmental hazards (such as rain or snow), and riders not always following the rules (including wearing helmets, not riding on sidewalks, not riding when drinking, etc.). We can expect to see a nationwide crackdown on regulation of electric scooters in 2019.

Electric Vehicles

As in 2018, California will continue setting the pace with electric vehicle policies and deployment in 2019. Other states are beginning to catch up, with legislation aimed at boosting and strengthening electric vehicle development. Expect to see electric vehicles getting bigger and better this year, with more SUVs, longer mileage ranges, and lower costs.

Additionally, utility companies are rolling out programs to meet electric vehicle demand. In addition to rebate programs, many utility companies are creating time-of-use programs to shift charging times toward less stressful times for the power grid.

Public Transportation

Public transit ridership has decreased over the last year in most major markets due to an increase in car ownership and the rise of rideshare services like Uber/Lyft. To combat this and incentivize more people to take public transit, some cities are looking at enacting congestion pricing that would charge drivers more for roadway access during rush hour. This idea has been successfully implemented in cities abroad, including Singapore, Stockholm, and London.

The question remains, however: will cities be able to overhaul their current systems with long-term investment to expand current transit coverage? That’s the only way to truly make this system work on a larger scale.

Still Have Questions?

Have questions about what you can do to lower your mileage? Reach out to us on Twitter, Facebook, or Instagram. Questions about coverage? Visit the help center. If you’re not already part of the Metromile fam, make the switch and start saving today! Click here to get a free quote.

Committed to Innovation: The Master of Science in Data Science Program at the University of San Francisco

Here at Metromile, we are all about making car insurance more fair and less painful — some may call this a lofty goal. We know that all it takes to make auto insurance simple and seamless is a bit of data, some science, a lot of technology, and a dash of magic. From the outside looking in, revolutionizing the auto insurance industry may seem easy, but take a peek under our insurance hood, and you’ll quickly realize that it takes a lot of systemization to keep this engine running. And at a company whose whole mission is to reinvent ways to manage risk, it should come as no surprise that our Data Science team is constantly buzzing; building and testing new models and furiously working to analyze Metromile data to find new opportunities to fix how insurance is traditionally “done.”

pay-per-mile car insurance

Revolutionizing an antiquated industry is no easy feat. It takes a village – a village of brilliant humans that are constantly iterating and innovating. One of the best ways to foster a culture of innovation is to work with local University programs like The Master of Science in Data Science (MSDS) Program at the University of San Francisco. It’s a win-win for both us, and the University because it gives students valuable business experience, and it gives us insight into new data patterns, trends, and opportunities.

The Program

The Practicum Program at USF pairs students with bay area companies, allowing them to apply their skills to gain experience, and reconcile mathematical theory with business practice. Each student is expected to create and refine a project with their partner company for 16 hours per week, while concurrently taking classes. This past Winter and Spring, we were lucky enough to have two USF students join us, Chenxi and Fang. They have spent the past six months trying to read mileage from odometer pictures, which can be used to correct the mileage measurements we receive from the Pulse device. This gets to the crux of what makes Metromile different from traditional insurers – we charge for insurance by the mile, so exact mileage is very important, and we are always looking for new ways to track mileage! Chenxi and Fang utilized some deep learning techniques, like the U-net model, in order to deal with object segmentation problems in computer vision.

The Project

During their time at Metromile, Chenxi and Fang applied state of the art techniques to real-world problems and gained experience using deep learning to solve computer vision challenges. Asking Chenxi and Fang what the most challenging part of their project was, they posited that the most taxing aspect was also what they learned the most from, “trying to solve a problem with limited resources and a relatively small dataset. We tried various ways to enlarge the dataset we have, as well as adjust the algorithms we used to overcome the issue.”

When asked whether or not they experienced a breakthrough moment, both Chenxi and Fang concluded. “There were several breakthrough moments during our work on this project, but the process is gradual and requires constant inputs and modification. The biggest challenge of our practicum was the project itself – extracting mileage from the odometer and correctly distinguishing that information from other similar numbers has turned out to be difficult. Luckily, our mentors have been patient and resourceful and have helped us a lot.”

One of these mentors, Chetan Ramaiah – a Data Science Manager here at Metromile – oversaw the internship program and recalled that Metromile had previously hired a 2016 participant of the program. It was the success from previous years that encouraged him to place Metromile in the program again. “The experiments conducted by Chenxi and Fang helped us identify a state of the art solution to a difficult research problem, and the process helped identify the various difficulties in modeling a solution to the problem. In addition, both Chenxi and Fang helped establish a benchmark on the quality of internship candidates.”

Internships at Metromile

According to Chetan, the project was a success.“The project adds a new dimension to Metromile’s mileage tracking abilities. The odometer project can independently verify and improve our mileage tracking from the Pulse and the OBD-II port.” Metromile looks forward to participating in the Practicum in coming years, and plans on taking on more Data Science and Engineer interns next summer. If you are interested in applying for an internship with Metromile please contact David Clifford, Director of Data Science (dclifford@metromile.com) or Mike Dicarlo, VP of Engineering (mdicarlo@metromile.com).

Connected Life 101

From laptops to smart phones to wearable trackers, we’re always connected. In fact, one-fifth of Americans reported being online constantly – from scrolling through social media on their commute, to using the internet all day at work to ordering delivery from an app. We’ve shared some of our favorite connected devices below.

connected cars

Home: Wired security systems are a thing of the past. Nest has three products that make any home a smart home: a thermostat that adapts life and changing seasons, a smoke alarm that you can you can silence and diagnose from your phone, and a security camera you can access from your phone that tracks both motion and sound alerts.

Car: You don’t have to have a fancy car to have a smart car. Metromile’s smart driving app, available to pay-per-mile customers, unlocks driving data and gives drivers information about their trips, trends, fuel levels, car location and more. It has even helped recover stolen cars! The Metromile app can also diagnose check engine lights. Find more information about Metromile’s pay-per-mile insurance offering or get a free quote here.

Eats: From getting groceries delivered through Instacart, meal prep delivered via Blue Apron, or your favorite restaurant through Postmates, getting food fast at home is simple. Eatsa, available in San Francisco and L.A., is connecting you to a simple healthy meal when you want to go out! You can order via their mobile app, or via iPad in their restaurant.

Exercise: No time to hit the yoga studio? Many studios offer online classes, like yogisanonymous.com. With a laptop and a yoga mat, you could be on your way to a sweet savasana. And if you haven’t joined the wearables crowd, try a Fitbit fitness tracker! Not only can you count your steps and stairs climbed, you can challenge your friends to see who can walk more in a week!

For more on how technology makes our life our life easier, check out this blog post.

5 Ways Technology Makes Your Life Easier

New technology has made it easier (and cheaper) to tackle chores and daily pains – from a long commute to work to splitting a check between 10 people at dinner. Below are some of our favorite modern conveniences.

pay-per-mile insurance

  • Spring Cleaning: Is your laundry piling up? Try Washio or Rinse to have your laundry picked up, cleaned and delivered without a second thought. And if you need a deep clean or your furniture assembled, book a cleaner or handyman instantly with Handy.
  • Transportation: Not only can you request a car to your door via Uber or Lyft, you can also access personal driving data and trends from your phone! For pay-per-mile car insurance customers, Metromile has a free app that gives drivers access to their data such as trips and trends, fuel level, car location and car health. We even issue street sweeping alerts in select markets.
  • Pets: If you have a dog in a city, chances are you’ll need a walker to let your dog out during the day. Wag! Has dog walkers on-demand ready to walk your pup, and they’ll even deliver a free lockbox to your apartment.
  • Payment: With mobile payment apps such as Venmo and Apple Pay, you can pay or charge people with the click of the button. You can even pay for your groceries with your phone!
  • Meals: Options for food delivery are no longer limited to pizza and pad thai from the store next door, you can now have a fresh meal delivered to your door! If you’d like to cook the meal yourself, try Blue Apron who delivers recipes and exact amounts of ingredients to your door. But if you’d like a warm home-cooked meal at your door, check out Munchery.

If you find yourself using a ride-share to get to work, or putting more miles on your bike than car, pay-per-mile insurance might be the right modern convenience for you! Not only will you have access to your trip data, but you can view your bill in real time on the app. Learn more about Metromile’s pay-per-mile insurance offering here.

Metromile Launches Pay-Per-Step Walking Insurance

Research has shown that our signature pay-per-mile car insurance offering has customers ditching their cars, many for their own two feet. Today, we’ve announced a new insurance offering to cover you from the disasters you could potentially face on foot: walking insurance.

Metromile’s walking insurance functions through its new smart walking app: the Metromile Pace. Several factors will be considered when creating your unique per-step rate, including broken bone history, clumsiness score and type of walking shoes.

Customers who sign up for the Metromile Pace will be covered in the event of:

  • Being caught in an unexpected rainstorm
  • Losing footing, tripping or falling
  • Worn out socks and shoes
  • Emergency walk-side assistance
  • And more!

It’s time to toss your pedometers! Users will see increased benefits with the walking insurance feature, including tracking number of steps, miles logged, shoe health and more. We’re especially excited about the “Walk Much?” feature that is able to gauge fall severity based on impact and immediately alerts emergency operators.

We’re offering a safe-walker discount for walkers who commit to not walk-and-text, use the handrail when available, and follow the safe route recommended by their Metromile Pace. There is also a bonus offer for adding a foot care package to your walking insurance, which includes a monthly pedicure and new pair of socks.

 

April Fools’! While we don’t actually offer pay-per-step walking insurance, we do offer pay-per-mile car insurance for low-mileage drivers. Get a free quote here.

4 Reasons Why Self-Driving Cars Are a Big Deal

Breakthroughs in self-driving car technology are becoming more frequent, but the concept might still seem very far-off. Before you brush off the idea of driverless cars, thinking it won’t apply to your own life anytime soon, think again. It’s looking pretty likely that autonomous technology will be available for the masses in the next decade or so! If you are wondering why this is such a big deal, here are four ways that self-driving cars will revolutionize the way we get around.

self_driving_cars

  1. Taxis (and Uber and Lyft) will be a lot cheaper. Since the cost of a driver will be removed from the equation, it will be much less expensive to operate taxis and all ridesharing platforms. That means cheaper rides for everyone! Because of the lower prices, many people will opt to take taxis versus driving their own car, which means there will be fewer cars on the road. This also means less traffic and less demand for parking. The best news? This is one of the most likely scenarios to happen soon, as Uber and Lyft are key proponents of autonomous technology and already putting forth substantial efforts into its development.
  2. Lives will be saved. Self-driving cars won’t be capable of doing risky (and illegal) things like speeding or drinking and driving, which means there will be far fewer accident-related deaths. In 2013, car accidents killed 32,000 people, which means we could save close to that many lives with the intelligence of self-driving cars.
  3. There will be less pollution. While we don’t know the exact specifications of self-driving cars, it’s presumed that they will have substantial energy efficiency benefits. A new report from the Intelligent Transportation Society is one of the first to quantify the benefits and projects a 2-4% reduction in oil consumption and related greenhouse gas emissions each year as “intelligent transportation systems” become available to the masses.
  4. The elderly will have more mobility. Self-driving cars will make it easier for the elderly and those who are vision impaired to get around since they will no longer have to rely on a driver to take them places. This will give them the freedom to move around according to their own schedules.

It’s pretty clear that the introduction of self-driving cars could have a significant impact on our everyday lives. Here at Metromile, we are especially excited to see how autonomous technology evolves and develops, as we are positioned to adapt our per-mile insurance model. Because we are able to segment periods of time (like with our Uber partnership where we can identify if a driver is driving for Uber or personal use), we’ll be able to help distinguish between when a car is controlled by a human or a computer. And if per-mile insurance is truly a future-proof concept, why not get started and start saving money today? Learn more at metromile.com/insurance.

Predicting the Top Car Tech Trends

The past year was big regarding transportation innovations, and we anticipate 2016 to be even more momentous. As we look forward to a new year of breakthroughs, let’s take a look at the technology that is already paving the way.

car_technology_trends

Consumers take control with the connected car.
The internet-of-things is in full force, and we don’t expect things to slow down anytime soon. One of the key drivers of this trend lies within the automobile industry, and connected car technology is already redefining the way we get around. In 2015, Microsoft, Google and Apple all announced plans for proprietary connected car platforms, bringing mobile phone functionality to your car’s console, signifying that this will likely become the norm very soon.

This technology has still not reached the masses, so if you don’t have one of the brand-new smart cars touting fancy touch screen dashboards or augmented reality, you can still enjoy the connected car experience with recent innovations. Gone are the days when you had to struggle with a clicker to open your garage, now the door can automatically open upon your arrival! In fact, the connected car industry, including apps specifically designed for cars and enhanced navigation, is estimated to grow to nearly $290 billion by 2020. Here at Metromile, we are definitely on top of this trend. All of our customers receive the Pulse, which plugs into a car’s OBD port to measure exact mileage and provide smart services like a car locator and a car health monitor. By using technology to measure exact mileage, we can save our low-mileage customers a lot of money.

The automotive industry capitalizes on big data.
Big data is another trend that continued to gain significant traction in 2015, and just like connected car technology, it is having a huge impact in the automotive industry. Manufacturers, insurers and transportation providers all have access to massive amounts of data, and if analyzed and applied correctly, can revolutionize the way they operate. Service and warranty repair data, user sentiment surrounding specific features and real-world vehicle performance are all things that can be measured to inform future car models. Even supply chain management can benefit from a better usage of big data — workflow software is already helping to uncover potential flaws while a car part is still in the blueprint stage. As Metromile’s CEO Dan Preston points out in a recent Huffington Post piece, the insurance sector is surprisingly antiquated when it comes to big data, but at Metromile, we are capitalizing on it by basing the monthly bill off of exact mileage. (more…)

The Best Car Tech Trends of 2015… and Now 2016

The past year was big regarding transportation innovations, and we anticipate 2016 to be even more momentous. As we look forward to a new year of breakthroughs, let’s take a look at the technology that is already paving the way.

car_technology_trends

Consumers take control with the connected car.
The internet-of-things is in full force, and we don’t expect things to slow down anytime soon. One of the key drivers of this trend lies within the automobile industry, and connected car technology is already redefining the way we get around. In 2015, Microsoft, Google and Apple all announced plans for proprietary connected car platforms, bringing mobile phone functionality to your car’s console, signifying that this will likely become the norm very soon.

This technology has still not reached the masses, so if you don’t have one of the brand-new smart cars touting fancy touch screen dashboards or augmented reality, you can still enjoy the connected car experience with recent innovations. Gone are the days when you had to struggle with a clicker to open your garage, now the door can automatically open upon your arrival! In fact, the connected car industry, including apps specifically designed for cars and enhanced navigation, is estimated to grow to nearly $290 billion by 2020. Here at Metromile, we are definitely on top of this trend. All of our customers receive the Pulse, which plugs into a car’s OBD port to measure exact mileage and provide smart services like a car locator and a car health monitor. By using technology to measure exact mileage, we can save our low-mileage customers a lot of money.

The automotive industry capitalizes on big data.
Big data is another trend that continued to gain significant traction in 2015, and just like connected car technology, it is having a huge impact in the automotive industry. Manufacturers, insurers and transportation providers all have access to massive amounts of data, and if analyzed and applied correctly, can revolutionize the way they operate. Service and warranty repair data, user sentiment surrounding specific features and real-world vehicle performance are all things that can be measured to inform future car models. Even supply chain management can benefit from a better usage of big data — workflow software is already helping to uncover potential flaws while a car part is still in the blueprint stage. As Metromile’s CEO Dan Preston points out in a recent Huffington Post piece, the insurance sector is surprisingly antiquated when it comes to big data, but at Metromile, we are capitalizing on it by basing the monthly bill off of exact mileage. (more…)