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Metromile and Ford: The Future of Personalized Car Insurance

Metromile is teaming up with Ford to bring drivers a new kind of car insurance experience.

From Day 1, we set out to provide drivers with a new type of car insurance. Traditional car insurance doesn’t meet drivers’ needs: high rates, mediocre service, and policies that don’t consider how people’s lifestyles and driving behaviors can change. 

Today’s news is the start of a fundamental shift: Metromile is teaming up with Ford to provide owners of eligible Ford vehicles with built-in connectivity with personalized car insurance that will be more affordable and fairer. 

This is an important milestone for Metromile, and it’s even more important for drivers. That’s why I’m so excited about it. It’s a tangible example of how car insurance can adapt more closely to how our lives are changing — where we live and work (for many of us, that’s the same place right now), how we drive, and where we drive. Connecting your car directly to your insurance is a big step toward making insurance much more personalized to your driving habits. We’ll see more convenience, customization, and savings than ever before.

On the surface, Metromile and Ford might seem like an odd couple. Ford, founded in 1903, is among the top 15 largest corporations in the U.S. by revenue, and Metromile is a VC-backed startup launched less than ten years ago. Still, both companies share several things in common. We’re both fiercely passionate about the future of mobility. We’re both committed to delivering meaningful experiences to vehicle owners, and we’re both eager to use connected vehicles to create new ways to save on insurance and reduce the cost of ownership.

For us, Ford will help us rapidly evolve how we price insurance, measure real-time risk, and put drivers in control of an individualized pay per mile rate based on how and how much you drive. Connected vehicles like Ford’s — packed with sensors and safety features — open up myriad opportunities for us to leapfrog ahead in each of these areas.

For Metromile customers: know that we’re relentlessly striving to make car insurance as fair, personalized, and advanced as we possibly can. Ford is just one example of how we’re making that happen (for example, we invented fractional insurance so that vehicle owners can avoid overpaying for too much coverage). 

I, and many Metromilers, are customers ourselves. Our parents, friends, and families are also Metromile customers. We’re proud of what we’re building, but for us, that’s not enough. We want to save you money and make you smile when you open the Metromile app. We want to be the kind of company that you tell your friends and family about. You have enough companies in your life that feel like an obligation, or like you chose the lesser of two evils. That’s not the company we’re building, and it never will be. We’re continually exploring ways to set the bar higher and finding ways to improve your savings and experience. You have my word. 
As we progress — both with our work with Ford and more broadly in our march for fairer insurance — I’ll be sharing more of my thoughts on the Metromile blog and LinkedIn.

Dan Preston, CEO

Q&A with Metromile’s Sana Farrukh

Meet Sana Farrukh, software engineer extraordinaire and a member of our mighty Boston team. (Aside: the team is looking to grow!) Here Sana shares about her background, what drew her to Metromile, and why she likes holding down our fort on the east coast.

Tell us a little bit about your background.

I am originally from Lahore, Pakistan. Back in 2015, I came to Boston for grad school and graduated from Tufts. My area of expertise is in computer networks, more specifically internal data center networks.

What interested you about Metromile?

There were a few things that compelled me to explore and advance my career with Metromile:

  1. The vast variety of interesting projects that Metromile offered based on the collected telematics data really spiked my interest. This is still a relatively new field, so there still is plenty of opportunity to explore even more interesting projects.
  2. It offered an entirely different domain, compared to what I had experience with, in academia. So I wanted to move into something different.
  3. As a small company with new, budding projects, Metromile offers the opportunity to work on projects from start to launch, not to be pigeon holed on one product or discipline. That means, too, that all my contributions are meaningful. 

 And now that I am here, it is also the people I work with and the amazing teams I’m part of, that makes me want to come in everyday.

As a software engineer, where specifically is your work focused right now?

So far I have been lucky enough to work on a few different projects: customer outreach, our analysis of driving behavior, mobile telematics integration (that is, syncing customers’ phones with their driving data). At present, my work is focused on making the new customer experience the very best possible one. This means ensuring that the customer receives consistent and coherent communication from us in their first few weeks and that their experience with the Pulse device is seamless.

Boston is a smaller office than our San Francisco and Tempe locations. Plusses and minuses?

Boston is indeed a small team, which is one of the things I love about our office. 

It is relatively quiet, which works best for me as I like to work in quiet environments. And being three hours ahead of San Francisco, we start early and get adequate time to work continuously before afternoon meetings start. 

Being a small team, everyone knows everyone. We often find ourselves taking a deeper dive into discussions about current teams, projects, interests both within and outside of work, vacation plans, pets, etc. Impromptu lunches often gather the whole office on one table — you can’t do that in a big office.

With everyone sitting close to everyone else, it is often effortless to seek guidance and help on tasks we need a second opinion on. Despite our size, we still have a good mix of folks from different teams, so we’re able to apply diverse expertise to problems.

What kind of person would you suggest consider working at Metromile?

Metromile is more than just an insurance company. It offers a unique combination of IoT, engineering, research, and, yes, insurance. Anyone who is interested in the intersection of those things should definitely look into Metromile.

Metromile’s New Chief People Officer: Mark Gundacker

Meet Mark Gundacker, Metromile’s new Chief People Officer. Mark joins us from Salesforce.org, the non-profit arm of Salesforce, where he led its growth from 350 to 1,100 employees — and prior to that brings decades of Human Resources leadership experience.

As we continue to grow our team (now more than 320!) across multiple offices and geographies, we’re excited to have Mark’s steady hand ensure we’re finding and keeping the best talent and remaining a best place to work.

What attracted you to Metromile?

I liked that Metromile is a disrupter. Creating an innovative model in a traditional industry is exciting. After working for a number of different organizations, including in the non-profit space, I wanted to work somewhere that I felt I could be innovative and make an impact. After meeting with Metromile leadership, I felt strongly that this was the right place.

What People philosophy do you bring coming from a nonprofit environment?

After working with passionate team members in the non-profit space, I had a new appreciation for the importance of having team members aligned to a strong organizational mission. If the team shares a common objective and vision it is much easier to work through any inevitable challenges — and this is as true in insurtech as it is anywhere else.

What’s something you wish people knew about People Ops?

Once people get to know me well they always tell me, “I can’t believe you are in HR”. And I always want to say “Take an HR person out to dinner and see how much fun you have!” Without a doubt, some of the most passionate, creative and amazingly fun people I have ever been with have been my HR colleagues.

Your background includes a pretty diverse set of industries. What perspective does that give you?

The big thing it’s given me is insight into how different types of organizations and people solve problems. I find this varied background helpful in being able to look at issues from a number of different angles.

What are your interests outside of work?

I’m on a number of non-profit boards including the Contra Costa Child Abuse Prevention Council, Food Bank of Contra Costa and Solano, and CISV — a program promoting peace education for children. Giving back has always been a big interest.

* * *

Welcome, Mark! We’re excited to have you.

A Q&A with our Customer (and Exotic Cat) Expert: Prentis Ginn

As Metromile’s Quality and Compliance Manager, Prentis Ginn wears a bunch of hats. The San Francisco Bay Area native holds a diverse set of responsibilities: liaising with regulators, implementing user feedback, and ensuring Metromile’s team members are delivering the best service possible. It’s a busy schedule, which Prentis has worked his way toward over nearly six years at the company, starting as a customer service agent and working his way up through quality assurance before taking on his current role. We asked him to offer a bit of insight into his world, both in and out of the office.

Tell us a little bit about your background.

I’m originally from the San Francisco Peninsula. I went to Chapman University in southern California and after graduating, I moved to New York City and worked for a fashion and design startup. Then I moved back to San Francisco to work for Metromile. 

What initially drew you to Metromile?

Every startup likes to say they’re “disrupting an industry.” Metromile was the first company I interviewed with where I actually believed that. I think I met with around ten people during my interview. Best decision I ever made. I immediately fell in love with my team.

How has your role evolved over your time there. 

Being here for almost six years, my role has definitely evolved over time. I was initially brought in to build out our customer experience team. That morphed into quality assurance and looking out for our CSAT and NPS (two core customer service metrics). Now, as a member of our Legal and Compliance team, I coordinate our regulator inquiries and administer our contract management system, and regulatory and compliance platform. 

What do you think makes Metromile so special?

It’s a unique business model. And the career opportunity is special — I’ve gotten to take on a number of different roles here that I might not have elsewhere.

Your first job at Metromile was Sr. Customer Experience Advocate, which involves talking to customers every day. How has this influenced your career path?

Having the ability to quickly process information, strong communication skills, and a genuinely empathetic mindset — these are qualities I’ve taken with me to other roles. This passion has enabled me to empathize with our customer’s position and think outside of regulatory requirements when communicating with various Departments of Insurance.

To those in customer-facing roles, my advice is: you know more about our customers than anyone else. If you see opportunities for improvement, speak up! You are the subject matter experts.

What do you do for fun when you’re not working?

I’m an exotic cat breeder…

Just kidding. 

However, I do have an exotic breed of cat called a Toyger. Other than that, I play Madden a lot. I play flag football on Saturdays with friends, I’m in five fantasy football leagues…I guess you can say I really like anything football-related. I’m a social butterfly, I’m always out and about on the weekends and I love carbs, sugar, and gluten.

Hey Elon, Welcome to Insurance. As You’re Learning, it’s Complicated

Dan Preston is the CEO of Metromile.
– – –
When Elon Musk announced that he was getting into car insurance, I wasn’t surprised — this is an industry full of opportunities for fresh thinking. I also wasn’t surprised he ran into some glitches on launch day.


I understand why Musk is frustrated: Tesla cars are packed with pioneering safety technology, but they are comparatively expensive to insure. We know firsthand; Metromile insures many Tesla owners (up 200% in the past year alone). Our data shows they are no more accident-prone than drivers of other cars, while their claims run about twice as much as other cars due to the high cost of repairing the on-board technology. 

From the expansion of autonomous navigation to the explosion of ride- and car-sharing platforms, technology is transforming both cars and car ownership. Insurance is ripe for disruption, too, which is why Metromile was founded eight years ago with a pay-per-mile model based on someone’s actual driving.

But drivers also value the service itself — beyond savings — whether that means a feature that monitors the car’s condition or an intuitive, design-first claims system. Consumers may be attracted to low prices, but how long they remain a customer depends on their experience.

The long-term opportunity lies in reducing the conflict and distrust between insurance companies and their customers. Right now, the relationship can be very transactional and full of tension. Insurers worry about risky drivers and fraudulent claims, while customers worry about being short-changed by obscure policy loopholes. It’s an adversarial process, and it can be grueling.

Technology offers massive opportunities for personalized insurance that can lower rates. We save many of our customers hundreds of dollars a year. Likewise, we recently partnered with Turo, a leading car-sharing company, to create fractional insurance to help reduce the costs of car ownership. 
And we’re on the cusp of even larger changes. Sooner or later, self-driving cars will become mainstream. As a result, cars will be safer and experience fewer accidents. While some accidents like a falling tree will happen no matter how advanced a car may be, we understand fundamentally that no two miles driven are the same; a mile driven autonomously could and should be insured differently than one driven by a human.

In the meantime, technology can reduce the tension between insurers and their customers. One way is by enabling personalized insurance customized to individual needs. Another is to make the claims process smoother and easier. Through AVA, our AI-powered claims system, we see the power of using a car’s telematics data to reconstruct an accident and assess the damage quickly — enabling us to pay some claims within minutes.   

That said, irresponsible technology can create traps. Just imagine how fast a fully-automated AI system could alienate customers by spitting out instant decisions they don’t like, or not being able to be guided by an experienced, empathetic claims-professional after a stressful accident. These are very nuanced issues; they require employees with exceptional insurance experience who can bring out the best of the technology while avoiding the roadside ditches.  

Without a doubt, I love Musk’s challenge to the status quo. But as Tesla pauses for an “algorithm update,” I hope they take my advice: insurance is about more than low prices. We need fresh thinking from carmakers and insurers alike.

Dream Job: Q&A With Metromile’s Sales Manager, Shannon Wright

Originally hailing from Washington State, Shannon Wright swapped the rainy Pacific Northwest for warmer temps in Arizona, unsure of her true calling, but enthusiastic to enter the working world. “I originally wanted to do broadcast journalism and then ended up with a public relations degree, but really had no idea what I wanted to do,” she says. “One of my good friends was a recruiter at a review company in Arizona and said I’d be great in sales. I really loved it!”

While Shannon had discovered a professional strength, after a few years in the position, she began to get curious about other opportunities at a new company making waves in the car insurance industry. “One of my really close friends was a manager in customer service at Metromile,” she says. “We’d be hanging out at girls’ nights and she’d just be raving about how much she loved her job. I was so jealous!” Wright liked going to work, but she began to wonder if she could ever really, truly love it. In her current role as Metromile’s sales manager, she definitely does.

“I volunteered to work a half day on the Fourth of July and some of my friends said, ‘oh no, that sucks,’ and I’m like ‘no, it’s okay, I’m excited to be with my team!’”

Here’s more about how this former sales wiz found her dream job. 

What was it like transitioning from your previous job into your first role at Metromile? They seem similar in the sense that both involve a lot of connecting with people. 

I had phone experience, but it was very different because I was now on the customer service side as opposed to sales. It was like starting over at square one as an entry level customer service agent, so that was a shock. I ended up being at Metromile for almost exactly a year before I was promoted to train all of our new sales hires, then our service hires — and I’ve even dabbled in claims training. I’ve joked that every four to 12 months, I do a different role here.

How many people did you train at a time?

Anywhere from four to 10 new hires in each class, but it really depends. The training is a month-long program so I was really going back to back for about a year before I switched into management. 

And how did that switch come about?

My current boss approached me about management and said he thought I’d be a great fit. I loved training, don’t get me wrong, but I wanted to try it out and he encouraged me. So I was an agent for a year, then in training for a year, then I switched into customer service management, and I was in that role for seven months before I switched into sales management. So it’s really come full circle — I can’t get enough of sales!  

What is a typical day like for you?

A typical day starts with coming in — that’s step one! — and then running a daily huddle with my team to get them super excited for the day, setting goals, and then just being there as a resource. I’ve known both sides of the business in customer service and sales, and here at Metromile, we do a lot of shadowing and coaching in the moment, so I’ll put on my headset and randomly listen to representatives’ calls live as they’re happening. I sit on the floor in the middle of the whole team so I’m there for coaching, and of course I have the typical one-on-ones with the agents once a week. Then there are also other team meetings. It’s really about me being a resource.

How would someone know if Metromile is a potential good fit for them?

Typically, if they’re driving less than 7,500 miles a year, we save them money, so that would be our major selling point. Metromile is really for low-mileage drivers — we can save them money because they’re not on the road much, so they’re not as much of a risk. That’s what keeps our prices down.

Why is Metromile such an awesome place to work?

There are so many advantages to working here. If I worked at a more rigid, non-start-up type of company, I never would have gotten promoted in my first year. Metromile is really good at developing employees as well as finding focus areas and things employees are good at to make those internal promotions, and I think that’s great.

It sounds cheesy, but I love our culture and this company. Whenever I talk to anyone, I’m now similar to the friend who brought me on board — I rave about how much I love Metromile!

* * *

Want to join Shannon and the rest of the team? We’re hiring in Arizona, San Francisco, and Boston.

A Q&A with Metromile’s Director of Talent Acquisition

When potential Metromile hires meet Jenn Hall, they’re likely not surprised to learn the six-foot-two director of talent acquisition used to play basketball. What they may not know is how her 15-year career on the court influenced her professional life today. “Basketball was all I knew — I was recruited into recruiting,” she says. “They told me tech recruiting was the hardest kind, so I said, ‘sign me up!’ I wound up applying the same fundamental methods that I used to become a D-1 basketball player: practice, commitment, and discipline.”

But the grit and determination Jenn developed as an athlete shaped her personal life as well. After graduating from Vanderbilt University, the Orange County native felt liberated to start embracing her authentic style — and her sexual orientation. “I came out at 23 and just wanted to feel comfortable in my own skin,” she says. “I had to figure out a lot, do a lot of self-discovery, and become more self-aware. It was challenging — when I stopped playing sports, I didn’t have distractions to cover up the other things in my life. Sports had always been my number one priority, so I had to figure out what motivates and inspires me — and I had to stop paying attention to what people were saying.”

It turns out that what inspired Jenn and continues to get her fired up to go to work each and every day is the opportunity to help others uncover their own unique strengths. “Staying strong wasn’t always easy, but It’s all about finding your voice.” We talked with Jenn to learn more about the ways discovering her identity helped contribute to her success and happiness.

How did you get your start in basketball?

I found my love for basketball when I was seven years-old, and that was really my first career. I played for 15 years. I started playing travel basketball when I was 12, and played through college — I was Division-1 at Vanderbilt. I could’ve gone to a lot of other schools but wanted to play in the best conference, the Southeastern conference, and get a degree. I chose a degree, known as Human and Organizational Development — this provided me the ability to pick and choose curriculum I was interested in, and could apply in the real world after school (Psychology, Communications, Organizational Structure & Processes).

Why did you pursue tech recruiting rather than a professional basketball career?

I had a lot of injuries — I had a broken bone in my foot, neck and problems, bad knees. I knew my shelf life would be super short. I also had a lot of friends in the WNBA who weren’t making money and were living at home and I didn’t have that option at the time.

You came out during that transition from sports to recruiting, right after college — tell us more about that time in your life.

It was hard. Really hard. I grew up in a conservative Christian household and it was not accepted. I had always been in a really good place with my parents and had talked to my mom like five times a day…and then didn’t talk to them for five years. It took a lot of patience and time. Basketball was my distraction and I was used to having to prove people wrong, so that was the mindset I had. I had supporters around me who made me feel like it was okay for me to be myself, like my best friend since seventh grade, Christina — I ended up recruiting her!

When did your family come around to your decision to embrace your true identity?

It was at my brother’s wedding seven years ago. It wasn’t easy and there were a lot of conversations. I was 23 years-old and couldn’t do it anymore. I very much hate lying and not being honest. But my family and I rebuilt our relationships and now we’re stronger than ever.

After college, you worked at Google, Hulu, Westfield, and OneMarket — how did you eventually find your way to Metromile?

I was laid off at my last job and realized it was really important to me to be surrounded by a team of people who truly cared about me.  People might think it’s super easy to find a job in my industry, but the hard part is that there aren’t a lot of companies I’d be proud to wear a hoodie for. It’s like being a basketball player and wearing a team jersey with a number on it; a lot of opportunities weren’t right for me. So I looked on Glassdoor and that’s when I applied to Metromile. I saw so many positive reviews of the leadership team, and even though I didn’t really know a lot about insurance, I saw that our CEO, Dan, is really into A.I. and data science, and I love tech — I’ve always loved tech. So I thought, ‘I’ll just apply, what’s the worst that could happen, they say no?’

But they didn’t! You got the job last August. Tell us about your role.

Right now I manage six people and I have one open role so I’ll have seven people in the next couple of months. I’m a career coach and manage executive recruiting, and as head of recruiting, my team does everything related to attracting, engaging, and hiring the talent we need to be successful as a company.  

How has your personal journey influenced your ability to manage employees and help people find their professional calling?

Being more self-aware has made me more aware of other people, which in turn lets me identify what they’re passionate about and what motivates them. I love being able to sit down and have conversations, sharing what I’ve done, and learning what inspires them. I can see where people can go and I like helping them get there.

You said the Panic! at the Disco song, “High Hopes,” reminds you of how embracing your identity paved the way for your success. Tell us more.

How doesn’t it? It’s like my anthem! The words are very poignant and relate to some situations I had to endure Like, “didn’t have a dime but I always had a vision.” I haven’t had anyone supporting me since I graduated from college and I had to get creative. I was selling my Jordan shoes on eBay to pay rent! It took time to get there. It hasn’t always been rosy and peachy, I’ve worked really hard. And when he sings, “mama said…” that to me is reminiscent of earlier parts of my career that were building blocks, not only to me as a person, but as a leader, and those situations made me even stronger than I ever could have been otherwise. As I went through my journey, I’ve been able to learn how to adapt and I’ve never stopped believing in myself and my abilities. As long as you have that, you can achieve anything.


Jenn and her team are hiring! Take a look at our open roles.

Metromile and Turo are Teaming Up to Redefine Auto Insurance

 
We’re planning to partner with Turo to offer a brand new fractional insurance policy for shared mobility. Turo hosts will pay an affordable monthly base rate plus a per mile rate only on the miles they drive themselves.

As personal mobility evolves from traditional car ownership to shared mobility, auto insurance must evolve to provide car owners with fractional insurance — and we’re proud to be leading the way. We’re delighted to team up with Turo, one of the world’s leading car sharing marketplaces, to offer a new fractional insurance policy specifically designed for flexible car ownership. With this partnership, Turo hosts with Metromile insurance will pay a base rate plus pennies-per-mile for the personal miles they drive. Turo Insurance Agency ensures coverage for hosts’ cars while they’re booked, and hosts can save money on auto insurance by not doubling up.

Innovating auto insurance

Turo has changed the economics of car ownership by allowing hosts to offset the cost of their vehicles, and, for many hosts, auto insurance is a significant portion of that cost. As the leader in pay-per-mile auto insurance, we’re constantly striving to make coverage fair, flexible, and affordable. We’re very excited to begin integrating our innovative approach to insurance with Turo’s protection plans, resulting in a holistic and adaptable policy that is well suited to the different ways that Turo hosts use their cars.

How it will work

To track miles, Turo hosts will plug the Metromile Pulse device into their car’s diagnostic port. We’ll use data from the Pulse and the Turo host’s calendar to separate personal miles from miles driven on Turo guest trips. Hosts will pay a per-mile rate for the miles they drive themselves plus an affordable base rate. We expect to first launch in Illinois, and then roll out across California, Washington, Oregon, Virginia, New Jersey, Arizona, and Pennsylvania. These eight states collectively represent where more than 40% of Turo hosts are currently located.
 
Turo hosts who become Metromilers will join our growing community of drivers who come for substantive savings and stay for an unmatched experience — with mobile app features like street sweeping alerts, engine code analysis, and fuel tracking — that engage drivers all along their journey.
 
This is just one example of our commitment to addressing mobility’s rapid evolution. We’ll keep you posted as this partnership launches around the country.

The role of data and analytics in becoming an “intelligent insurer”

Metromile VP Sathish Koteshwar recently spoke at Gartner’s Data and Analytics conference in Orlando. With several insurance-focused tracks and more than 4000 attendees, he came back even more pumped about what we’re doing at Metromile and our opportunity ahead. He shared some highlights with us.

What piqued your interest at the conference?

SK: For starters, I’d say Gartner’s own research struck the biggest chord. For example, Gartner predicts that by 2025 AI will become a requirement, not a competitive advantage. It made me realize we have a huge leg up at Metromile.

Gartner described the “Intelligent Insurer” as having four fundamental requirements:

1) A clear and innovative vision for the organization  

2) A strong data and analytics foundation

3) Industry leading leadership/people/culture

4) Cutting-edge technology and platform.

It’s exciting to be so far ahead on these fundamentals when others are just getting started.

Why are other insurers lagging?  

SK: The concept of telematics is new for many insurance providers and they are still figuring out how to incorporate it in their business models. It’s harder for insurers to pivot – given the size of their organizations, their complex hybrid infrastructure and lack of driving data around their policy holders. Their model is so different than ours, since we’ve built the very core of its business model around telematics.

What was the biggest takeaway on the claims front?

SK: I learned that many other insurers are just starting to implement some form of automated claims. They realize there are cost benefits and the fantastic customer experience it creates, in doing so, and want to drive those efficiencies for their organization. Yet, they’re very much in the early innings compared to where we’re at at Metromile with AVA, our AI driven claims system.”

How about in the area of fraud?

SK: Insurers are spending a lot of money on fraud detection — but they’re doing it with an army of humans trying to manually track it down, because they don’t have big, high quality data sets. Hearing that gave me an even greater appreciation for the fact that thanks our Pulse device we have 100% continuous telematics across all of our policy holders. This data — a 100% footprint of driving / behavior data — prevents so much fraud from happening in the first place; and if it does occur, we’re able to quickly root it out. This further enables us to pass these savings to our customers and offer really competitive pricing on auto insurance.

Were there many insurers like us, who are 100% in the cloud?

SK: Many still have a hybrid implementations within their organizations. They have some systems running on premise and some running in the cloud, and slowly moving more to the cloud. I think it would be really tough to do what we do if we weren’t 100% natively in the cloud. It means we can be so nimble and move really fast, and be that much further ahead of the competitive curve.”

What are the data and analytics themes that emerged for 2019?

SK: According to Gartner, the six key themes are:

  1. Focus on intelligent processing
  2. Maximize customer segmentation through life event/style modeling
  3. Enhance the customer experience through personalization and automation
  4. Build quality algorithms through improved data science.
  5. Build strength through more / better  data (eg, IoT).
  6. Augment humans through machines

Given our work at Metromile, I wasn’t surprised by these themes, but they reinforced for me that we’re focused in all of the right areas.

What’s next for you?

SK: Getting back to work! I’m even more excited about our future here at Metromile. Our big head start is a huge competitive advantage, and it’s definitely going to help us win market share.

The Gartner conference helped drive a new level of understanding and purpose in my team’s work, our strategy, and how we will help Metromile revolutionize insurance.

Welcome Paw Andersen, Metromile’s new CTO

This week, Paw Andersen, a true technologist with 20+ years of engineering leadership experience, joined Metromile as CTO. He was most notably a senior leader of engineering in Uber’s Advanced Technology group, where he grew his team from 27 to 700. Beyond ride sharing and autonomous vehicles, he’s been on the front lines of technical challenges in several sectors, including GIS, FinTech and E-commerce, ranging from small startups to large, established companies. Originally from Denmark, he now lives in the Bay Area with his family.

Paw Andersen, Metromile CTO


According to Paw, there’s a thread that runs through his career. “What’s been constant is my passion for enabling teams to effectively build software, while also empowering them to enjoy their biggest personal growth,” he said.

As CTO, Paw is responsible for leading, coaching, motivating, and growing a world-class engineering team in our San Francisco and Boston offices. He’s also a member of executive leadership, working closely with CEO Dan Preston, Chief Product Officer Shaun Clowes, and many others.

“We’re hyper-focused on reimagining insurance for consumers and carriers alike. What struck me about Paw is that he has a huge passion for creating products that directly help customers,” said Dan. “Paw has a bird’s eye view of the future of mobility, and I’m confident he’ll be instrumental in bringing our ‘invent the future’ value to life. He’s equally passionate on building a positive culture internally, and an environment that enables Metromilers to do their best work. Having been Metromile’s CTO in our earliest days, I’m excited for Paw’s leadership and welcome him to the team.”

In talking with Paw, he shared a bit about what attracted him to Metromile. Here’s what he had to say.

“I’m very excited to join the Metromile team. For me, there are three things that matter most:

  1. I’m an engineer at heart. I like to build things that are challenging to build, and have a lot of data-driven problems to solve.
  2. I want to build things that matter to people in real life. Something that makes people want to part with their money, that makes their life better. That matters to me a lot.
  3. I want to work with really smart people who have fun together.

“Metromile checks all three of these boxes and more. That’s because I very much believe in Metromile’s future. Working at Uber, I became immersed in mobility and learned how that landscape is continuing to evolve. When I think about the future of mobility, I see Metromile as a key player in expanding individual freedom.”

Interested in working with Paw and the rest of our engineering team? We’re hiring tech talent in our Boston and San Francisco offices.