Do You Need A Car at College?


When I made the brave and lengthy journey to college many years ago (just kidding, my school was 70 miles from home), I spent the first two semesters carless. Freshmen didn’t have the privilege of parking spots, and if we’re honest, my freeway driving skills were still developing.
Weekend trips to visit mom and dad required either the generosity of mobile friends or six spare hours to spend on the painfully slow train. But navigating the tiny college town without wheels was easy, and before long I didn’t miss Kermit (the family name for my hand-me-down green Ford Taurus — may he rest in peace) at all.
When I came back as a sophomore, however, Kermit came too, and having my car at school suddenly opened up new opportunities — driving to the closest big city mall, skipping the dysfunctional bus service and sleeping in, blasting Ashlee Simpson albums on the way to my boyfriend’s house (it was 2006, okay?). But was all that driving necessary? Of course not. So from my dated dilemma arises a modern question: do kids really need their cars at college?
The Pros
There are some compelling reasons to bring a car to campus:

  • The convenience factor. If you live off-campus, a car could help you get to lectures on time or make it possible to snag a job that pays more than any on-campus gig.
  • Grocery shopping is a lot less of a workout. Once you’re out of the dorms, it’s pretty much up to you to bring home the bacon (and eggs, and bread, and heavy arm-crushing produce). Having a car certainly makes it easier to transport a shopping haul.
  • You’ll have a place to call your own. College life can be cramped. Having your own car means you’ll have a sacred space to escape to (and escape in) any time you need a break from your roommates, classmates, study buddies, etc.

The Cons
Yes, having a car at college means a bit more freedom and autonomy, but it also means:

  • Paying for insurance, parking, maintenance, repairs, and more. There’s no way to avoid it: driving is expensive.
  • Spending precious time searching for a spot. Driving may shave minutes off your commute, but that time saved can quickly be replaced circling the block.
  • Being less invested in your campus life. Having an easy escape means you’re probably not spending a ton of time getting to know the people around you or exploring new opportunities and adventures. And isn’t that kind of the whole point of college (besides that coveted degree, of course)?
  • A higher risk of accidents. If you’re behind the wheel at all, you’re already at risk for an accident. But if you’re tired from studying, partying, working, and just generally depriving yourself of proper shut-eye, you’re putting yourself at an even higher risk.

On Balance
Having a car at college can definitely have some perks, but overall, the cost — financial and otherwise — is far higher than the potential benefit. And leaving the car at home means more time and energy to invest in immersing yourself in the college experience.
It won’t come as a surprise that we’re encouraging people to drive less; we think a world with fewer cars, less crowded streets, and cleaner air is something to shoot for. Do you agree? If so, we’ll be here with insurance to make things easier.


Michelle Konstantinovsky is a San Francisco-based freelance journalist, UC Berkeley alumna, and Metromile customer. She’s written extensively on health, body image, entertainment, lifestyle, design, and tech for outlets like Cosmopolitan, Marie Claire, Teen Vogue, O: The Oprah Magazine, Seventeen, Slate, SPIN, Entrepreneur, xoJane, SF Weekly, California Home + Design, and more.

How to Choose Insurance Extras

Carrying car insurance is a no-brainer. Besides keeping you within the bounds of the law, the major nuts and bolts of an insurance policy — your coverage limits, deductibles, and so on — are there to help you avoid financial ruin in the case of an accident.
But what about those options like rental coverage or a $0 deductible for glass repair, that are nice-to-haves but not necessarily standing between you and bankruptcy? Are you cheating yourself by not adding these bonuses to your plan? To help you avoid decision paralysis, here’s what you need to know about three common car insurance add-ons.

$0 glass deductible
A practically inevitable part of driving is an eventual glass issue, and even the most high-end vehicles are at risk for chips and cracks in the windows and windshield. The good news is these minor problems can be fixed quickly and easily. The not-so-good news is they typically aren’t cheap. 
If you’re particularly concerned about the state of your glass or if you’re in the habit of driving your car through construction zones or other environments that increase your likelihood of chips and cracks, you may want to consider opting for glass and windshield coverage. With a zero-dollar glass deductible, your insurer will be the one footing the bill for repairs, so if you do experience a broken, chipped, or cracked windshield or window, you won’t be on the hook for costs.
Rental coverage
When an accident occurs, you’re likely consumed with gathering details, submitting a claim, and making sure you handle any necessary medical issues. But there’s another major detail many people forget to consider in the aftermath of an accident: how to get around if your car needs to go into the shop for repairs, or worse — it was totaled.
If you rely on a car for work, errands, or any other daily responsibility, you’ll probably need to replace your damaged vehicle with something as soon as possible. The easiest option would be to rent a car, but — surprise, surprise — rental cars can be pretty pricey. By adding rental car reimbursement to your car insurance plan, you protect yourself and your wallet with the assurance that your insurer will cover the cost of your rental while your car is out of commission. If the thought of being without wheels is too much for you to bear, you might want to consider this extra a must-have.
Roadside assistance
Is there anything worse than the thought of being stranded by the side of the road? There are dozens of reasons this could happen — especially if you have a…let’s say “less than reliable” vehicle. Car stuff just happens. Enter roadside assistance.
By adding roadside assistance to your insurance plan, you’re covered if you need any of these:

  • Flat tire fixes
  • Locksmith services
  • Emergency gasoline delivery
  • Towing (up to the distance outlined in your contract)

(Brag alert: Metromile’s roadside assistance works completely through our app — no digging cards out of your glovebox or looking up missing phone numbers.)
Like the other extras, roadside assistance can provide peace of mind. And if that peace of mind feels worthwhile, roadside assistance coverage might be for you. The good news is that none of these extras will break the bank — they often cost only a few bucks a month.
So the question is: how much value do you place on peace of mind?
Need more info on these or any other Metromile features or extras? Visit metromile.com today to get a free quotewe’ll find the plan for you, with or without the extras.

How I Drive: Pay-Per-Mile is for Car Nuts, Too

Meet Ted Howard: a self-proclaimed car nut who, though he owns three cars, drives far fewer miles than most. Ted lives in a beach town, so juggles parking three cars on the street while fixing them up and hunting for his next deal. Paying for insurance by the mile keeps that hobby approachable for him by cutting down on the expense.

You’re one guy with three cars.
I feel like I should say I currently have three cars. I’m always looking at cars for sale. Right now I have a 2011 Honda Accord V6, a 2002 Porsche Boxster S, and a ‘98 Mustang convertible.
I’m a car nut. It’s really because of Metromile I can deal with having more than two. The Accord is the most reliable and the one I don’t care about. I’ve always loved Boxsters, but it’s never going to be a good only car to have — actually, it costs me less money to have more than one car as opposed to having only the Porsche, since I can avoid the big maintenance bills by not driving it every day.
And you don’t take them to work?
I work from home, teaching clients around the world the science of the mind-body connection to eliminate chronic pain. I do that by video or over the phone, so I do not have a typical commute.
I have these three cars, but I’m only one driver. My mileage is below average compared to people who have only one car. Someone told me about Metromile a few years ago, and it’s a great fit for me.
When and why do you drive?
I do have occasional in-person meetings for work. Or I drive to lunch or to the gym — standard errands. I have intentions to bike more, too, to drive even less. But since I work from home I sometimes feel cooped up in the house, and I’ll take the Porsche out at night and drive 14 miles to get pizza.
My family lives in Las Vegas, so I occasionally take the trip out there which is 600 miles. If I don’t do that trip, I’m probably only driving 600 total miles a month. Cost-wise, the three cars with pay-per-mile insurance cost me about the same, or sometimes less, than two cars with regular insurance.
So you’re saving money with Metromile
Sometimes it’s about the same as when I only had two cars and traditional insurance; the big difference is that pay-per-mile makes it painless to indulge my hobby.
I look at it this way: no matter how many more cars I add I never have to pay more for mileage. I’m always going to drive the same amount of places regardless of how many cars are sitting out on the street.
You park all your cars on the street?
I have one parking spot, but by default park on the street. It’s easier when there’s no weekend beach traffic.
Ever forget where you’re parked and use the Metromile app to locate your car?
You know, I never thought of using the app for that, but I do use it to keep tabs on my mechanics. I can take a look at the app and see if they’ve moved it. When I see they’ve taken it for a multiple test drives I can tell that the work is nearly done.
I did use the location feature when I was living abroad for five months. I had asked a friend to drive my Porsche once a month just to keep it running, and looking at the app I could see my friend was at the comedy club in LA. I got to call him and hear some live comedy at 10am in Thailand, and because of the Metromile alerts I was able to call him at the right time. It was a way to connect with my friends at home for a bit.
How about for maintenance and diagnostics?
I do use the diagnostics tool for any codes that are being thrown on the car. It’s the quickest, easiest way to get the info and also offers me the ability to not go out to the car to get it. You can get a bluetooth device that does the same, but they’re 40 bucks and you need to be near the car. This is free and emails me the info.
Anything else we should know?
The #1 thing for me is I like cars. I’m always looking at cars for sale. This type of insurance allows me to think about owning more projects. It’s just not going to cost as much to add a car as it would otherwise. This removes that one huge expense that gets in the way. Buying and fixing up old cars, that’s my hobby.
 In reality, the cost of traditional insurance is more of an inconvenience than parking three cars on the street in a beach town.

How to Read Your Metromile Insurance Bill

Metromile’s bills are a little different compared to other insurers. We like to think ours sets customers up for success and savings.

To get a better grasp on your driving (and savings!) you’ll want to get familiar with your monthly statement. Here’s everything you need to know.

(1) The balance section is the meat of your bill, showing all the ins and outs of the current billing period. A few things to note here:

(A) Your base rate is a fixed amount you’ll pay every month, regardless of the miles you drive. Think of this as the cost of your insurance for when your car is parked. Technically speaking, the base rate is a personalized daily rate, so you’ll have a lower base rate in months with fewer days like February. 

(B) The per mile rate is the difference-maker. We add up all the miles you’ve driven during the billing period and charge you only for each mile you drive. (Keep in mind that the per mile rate is charged at the end of the billing period while the fixed base rate is charged in advance of next month’s driving.)

(C) The adjustments line reflects small corrections — for example, we might refund a few miles if we realize a trip was shorter than initially reported.

(D) You might see a pre-payment credit. If so, it means you paid us a bit of money in advance of your first term to help reduce risk (and thus prices) and we’re crediting the pre-payment back on every bill during your first six months.

(2) The bar graph in the activity section tracks the miles you’ve driven each day. The line graph tracks your total miles for the billing period (left axis) and how those miles impact your bill (right axis). You’ll also see an at-a-glance summary of your current situation: balance, miles driven, and days left in the billing cycle.

(3) Trips for this billing cycle is a comprehensive view of trips you’ve taken during this billing cycle. Review your travels on a map, take stock of your driving habits, and even find out precisely how much each trip cost to insure.

If all of this sounds like a better way to approach your car insurance, then it’s time to sign up for Metromile — if you haven’t already!

And if you have questions about your bill, your rates, or whether Metromile is the right fit for you, we’re available to help at (888) 242-5204 or metromile.com/help.

Dream Job: Q&A With Metromile’s Sales Manager, Shannon Wright

Originally hailing from Washington State, Shannon Wright swapped the rainy Pacific Northwest for warmer temps in Arizona, unsure of her true calling, but enthusiastic to enter the working world. “I originally wanted to do broadcast journalism and then ended up with a public relations degree, but really had no idea what I wanted to do,” she says. “One of my good friends was a recruiter at a review company in Arizona and said I’d be great in sales. I really loved it!”

While Shannon had discovered a professional strength, after a few years in the position, she began to get curious about other opportunities at a new company making waves in the car insurance industry. “One of my really close friends was a manager in customer service at Metromile,” she says. “We’d be hanging out at girls’ nights and she’d just be raving about how much she loved her job. I was so jealous!” Wright liked going to work, but she began to wonder if she could ever really, truly love it. In her current role as Metromile’s sales manager, she definitely does.

“I volunteered to work a half day on the Fourth of July and some of my friends said, ‘oh no, that sucks,’ and I’m like ‘no, it’s okay, I’m excited to be with my team!’”

Here’s more about how this former sales wiz found her dream job. 

What was it like transitioning from your previous job into your first role at Metromile? They seem similar in the sense that both involve a lot of connecting with people. 

I had phone experience, but it was very different because I was now on the customer service side as opposed to sales. It was like starting over at square one as an entry level customer service agent, so that was a shock. I ended up being at Metromile for almost exactly a year before I was promoted to train all of our new sales hires, then our service hires — and I’ve even dabbled in claims training. I’ve joked that every four to 12 months, I do a different role here.

How many people did you train at a time?

Anywhere from four to 10 new hires in each class, but it really depends. The training is a month-long program so I was really going back to back for about a year before I switched into management. 

And how did that switch come about?

My current boss approached me about management and said he thought I’d be a great fit. I loved training, don’t get me wrong, but I wanted to try it out and he encouraged me. So I was an agent for a year, then in training for a year, then I switched into customer service management, and I was in that role for seven months before I switched into sales management. So it’s really come full circle — I can’t get enough of sales!  

What is a typical day like for you?

A typical day starts with coming in — that’s step one! — and then running a daily huddle with my team to get them super excited for the day, setting goals, and then just being there as a resource. I’ve known both sides of the business in customer service and sales, and here at Metromile, we do a lot of shadowing and coaching in the moment, so I’ll put on my headset and randomly listen to representatives’ calls live as they’re happening. I sit on the floor in the middle of the whole team so I’m there for coaching, and of course I have the typical one-on-ones with the agents once a week. Then there are also other team meetings. It’s really about me being a resource.

How would someone know if Metromile is a potential good fit for them?

Typically, if they’re driving less than 7,500 miles a year, we save them money, so that would be our major selling point. Metromile is really for low-mileage drivers — we can save them money because they’re not on the road much, so they’re not as much of a risk. That’s what keeps our prices down.

Why is Metromile such an awesome place to work?

There are so many advantages to working here. If I worked at a more rigid, non-start-up type of company, I never would have gotten promoted in my first year. Metromile is really good at developing employees as well as finding focus areas and things employees are good at to make those internal promotions, and I think that’s great.

It sounds cheesy, but I love our culture and this company. Whenever I talk to anyone, I’m now similar to the friend who brought me on board — I rave about how much I love Metromile!

* * *

Want to join Shannon and the rest of the team? We’re hiring in Arizona, San Francisco, and Boston.

Great, You Got a Speeding Ticket. Wondering if it'll Affect Your Insurance Rates?

 
I remember my one and only speeding ticket experience like it was yesterday. Sadly, it wasn’t, which means my college days are farther behind me than I like to admit. I was driving back to school after a weekend at my parents’ house, convinced I was commuting with the flow of traffic. But the Highway Patrol Officer who pulled me over begged to differ. He said I was going 15 miles over the speed limit. The only rational response I could offer in the moment was a full-on hysterical sob. I was such a chicken behind the wheel! How could I have committed a crime?! And how would this affect me financially?

Speeding tickets aren’t cheap. The average cost in California is $710 for a $35 base-fine infraction, and that’s not even close to some of the costs in other parts of the country (Virginia reportedly has the highest penalties, with citations that can cost upwards of $1,000!). But that initial sting of the ticket itself is just part of the overall financial repercussions. Speeding tickets do affect your insurance rates, and they may have a bigger impact than you think.
A major factor in determining your insurance rate is your driving record. That helps insurers get a sense of how much of a risk you might be on the road. And guess what determines your driving record in addition to accidents and minor fender benders. That’s right: traffic violations. The more tickets you have, the more likely it is that your insurance rates will rise. The (kind of) good news is that according to an analysis from The Zebra, speeding tickets are the least costly kind of traffic violations when it comes to insurance rates. But the potential price hike can still be significant: an average of $354 per year.  
The thing about speeding is that it’s not a black and white issue; a driver may be caught speeding a few miles over the limit or far past the limit. Different insurance companies may adjust that driver’s rates differently depending on the severity of the speed infraction. While some companies only increase rates if a driver receives a ticket for going more than 15 mph over the posted limit, other companies may not increase the rate at all if it’s a first-time offense. Multiple violations will have a greater impact, and in some states, accumulating multiple “points” on your driving record (the system varies by state) can lead to more than sky-high insurance premium — it can even lead to license revocation or suspension.
Luckily, for unintentional speed demons like me, traffic violations don’t permanently affect your insurance rates. Most companies examine your list of traffic violations over the last three to five years when determining your rate, and once a ticket is removed from your driving record (this varies by state, but most states take away the points after three years), insurance companies can no longer hold the infraction against you.
One surefire way to assure you’re getting the best rate possible is to investigate all your options. If you’re a low-mileage driver looking for a better fit, Metromile may just be your perfect solution. Visit metromile.com today to receive a free quote.

Great, You Got a Speeding Ticket. Wondering if it’ll Affect Your Insurance Rates?

 
I remember my one and only speeding ticket experience like it was yesterday. Sadly, it wasn’t, which means my college days are farther behind me than I like to admit. I was driving back to school after a weekend at my parents’ house, convinced I was commuting with the flow of traffic. But the Highway Patrol Officer who pulled me over begged to differ. He said I was going 15 miles over the speed limit. The only rational response I could offer in the moment was a full-on hysterical sob. I was such a chicken behind the wheel! How could I have committed a crime?! And how would this affect me financially?

Speeding tickets aren’t cheap. The average cost in California is $710 for a $35 base-fine infraction, and that’s not even close to some of the costs in other parts of the country (Virginia reportedly has the highest penalties, with citations that can cost upwards of $1,000!). But that initial sting of the ticket itself is just part of the overall financial repercussions. Speeding tickets do affect your insurance rates, and they may have a bigger impact than you think.
A major factor in determining your insurance rate is your driving record. That helps insurers get a sense of how much of a risk you might be on the road. And guess what determines your driving record in addition to accidents and minor fender benders. That’s right: traffic violations. The more tickets you have, the more likely it is that your insurance rates will rise. The (kind of) good news is that according to an analysis from The Zebra, speeding tickets are the least costly kind of traffic violations when it comes to insurance rates. But the potential price hike can still be significant: an average of $354 per year.  
The thing about speeding is that it’s not a black and white issue; a driver may be caught speeding a few miles over the limit or far past the limit. Different insurance companies may adjust that driver’s rates differently depending on the severity of the speed infraction. While some companies only increase rates if a driver receives a ticket for going more than 15 mph over the posted limit, other companies may not increase the rate at all if it’s a first-time offense. Multiple violations will have a greater impact, and in some states, accumulating multiple “points” on your driving record (the system varies by state) can lead to more than sky-high insurance premium — it can even lead to license revocation or suspension.
Luckily, for unintentional speed demons like me, traffic violations don’t permanently affect your insurance rates. Most companies examine your list of traffic violations over the last three to five years when determining your rate, and once a ticket is removed from your driving record (this varies by state, but most states take away the points after three years), insurance companies can no longer hold the infraction against you.
One surefire way to assure you’re getting the best rate possible is to investigate all your options. If you’re a low-mileage driver looking for a better fit, Metromile may just be your perfect solution. Visit metromile.com today to receive a free quote.

Becoming Jenn Hall: A Q&A with Metromile’s Director of Talent Acquisition

 
When potential Metromile hires meet Jenn Hall, they’re likely not surprised to learn the six-foot-two director of talent acquisition used to play basketball. What they may not know is how her 15-year career on the court influenced her professional life today. “Basketball was all I knew — I was recruited into recruiting,” she says. “They told me tech recruiting was the hardest kind, so I said, ‘sign me up!’ I wound up applying the same fundamental methods that I used to become a D-1 basketball player: practice, commitment, and discipline.”

But the grit and determination Jenn developed as an athlete shaped her personal life as well. After graduating from Vanderbilt University, the Orange County native felt liberated to start embracing her authentic style — and her sexual orientation. “I came out at 23 and just wanted to feel comfortable in my own skin,” she says. “I had to figure out a lot, do a lot of self-discovery, and become more self-aware. It was challenging — when I stopped playing sports, I didn’t have distractions to cover up the other things in my life. Sports had always been my number one priority, so I had to figure out what motivates and inspires me — and I had to stop paying attention to what people were saying.”
 
It turns out that what inspired Jenn and continues to get her fired up to go to work each and every day is the opportunity to help others uncover their own unique strengths. “Staying strong wasn’t always easy, but It’s all about finding your voice.” We talked with Jenn to learn more about the ways discovering her identity helped contribute to her success and happiness.
 
How did you get your start in basketball?
 
I found my love for basketball when I was seven years-old, and that was really my first career. I played for 15 years. I started playing travel basketball when I was 12, and played through college — I was Division-1 at Vanderbilt. I could’ve gone to a lot of other schools but wanted to play in the best conference, the Southeastern conference, and get a degree. I chose a degree, known as Human and Organizational Development — this provided me the ability to pick and choose curriculum I was interested in, and could apply in the real world after school (Psychology, Communications, Organizational Structure & Processes).
 
Why did you pursue tech recruiting rather than a professional basketball career?
 
I had a lot of injuries — I had a broken bone in my foot, neck and problems, bad knees. I knew my shelf life would be super short. I also had a lot of friends in the WNBA who weren’t making money and were living at home and I didn’t have that option at the time.
 
You came out during that transition from sports to recruiting, right after college — tell us more about that time in your life.
 
It was hard. Really hard. I grew up in a conservative Christian household and it was not accepted. I had always been in a really good place with my parents and had talked to my mom like five times a day…and then didn’t talk to them for five years. It took a lot of patience and time. Basketball was my distraction and I was used to having to prove people wrong, so that was the mindset I had. I had supporters around me who made me feel like it was okay for me to be myself, like my best friend since seventh grade, Christina — I ended up recruiting her!
 
When did your family come around to your decision to embrace your true identity?
 
It was at my brother’s wedding seven years ago. It wasn’t easy and there were a lot of conversations. I was 23 years-old and couldn’t do it anymore. I very much hate lying and not being honest. But my family and I rebuilt our relationships and now we’re stronger than ever.
 
After college, you worked at Google, Hulu, Westfield, and OneMarket — how did you eventually find your way to Metromile?
 
I was laid off at my last job and realized it was really important to me to be surrounded by a team of people who truly cared about me.  People might think it’s super easy to find a job in my industry, but the hard part is that there aren’t a lot of companies I’d be proud to wear a hoodie for. It’s like being a basketball player and wearing a team jersey with a number on it; a lot of opportunities weren’t right for me. So I looked on Glassdoor and that’s when I applied to Metromile. I saw so many positive reviews of the leadership team, and even though I didn’t really know a lot about insurance, I saw that our CEO, Dan, is really into A.I. and data science, and I love tech — I’ve always loved tech. So I thought, ‘I’ll just apply, what’s the worst that could happen, they say no?’
 
But they didn’t! You got the job last August. Tell us about your role.
 
Right now I manage six people and I have one open role so I’ll have seven people in the next couple of months. I’m a career coach and manage executive recruiting, and as head of recruiting, my team does everything related to attracting, engaging, and hiring the talent we need to be successful as a company.  
 
How has your personal journey influenced your ability to manage employees and help people find their professional calling?
 
Being more self-aware has made me more aware of other people, which in turn lets me identify what they’re passionate about and what motivates them. I love being able to sit down and have conversations, sharing what I’ve done, and learning what inspires them. I can see where people can go and I like helping them get there.
 
You said the Panic! at the Disco song, “High Hopes,” reminds you of how embracing your identity paved the way for your success. Tell us more.
 
How doesn’t it? It’s like my anthem! The words are very poignant and relate to some situations I had to endure Like, “didn’t have a dime but I always had a vision.” I haven’t had anyone supporting me since I graduated from college and I had to get creative. I was selling my Jordan shoes on eBay to pay rent! It took time to get there. It hasn’t always been rosy and peachy, I’ve worked really hard. And when he sings, “mama said…” that to me is reminiscent of earlier parts of my career that were building blocks, not only to me as a person, but as a leader, and those situations made me even stronger than I ever could have been otherwise. As I went through my journey, I’ve been able to learn how to adapt and I’ve never stopped believing in myself and my abilities. As long as you have that, you can achieve anything.

Help! I Need Roadside Assistance

 
One of the many reasons drivers seek out a solid car insurance plan is to feel totally secure in the event that something unexpected occurs. And one major way Metromile takes care of its customers is by offering 24/7 roadside assistance. That means if you need a jump, tow, or locksmith any time of day, Metromile will get you back up and running in no time. But unlike traditional insurers who require customers to call in and navigate a lengthy telephone process before actually receiving help, Metromile makes things super simple so you can request assistance in a way that’s quick and convenient for you.

Three Easy Ways to Get Roadside Assistance ASAP
 
If you opt to add roadside assistance to your Metromile plan (just $5-$7 extra a month), the vehicles on your policy will be covered for flat tire changes, battery jump starts, locksmith services, and emergency gasoline deliveries. To utilize any of those perks, you can do one of three things:
 

  1. Use your Metromile app. You already know the Metromile app is awesome for a multitude of reasons (it can keep you on track with important trip data, keep your car in tip top shape thanks to diagnostic info, and much more). But the Metromile app is also one key way to access roadside assistance. Here’s how:
    1. Log into your app and tap the ‘Insurance’ icon on the bottom right.
    2. Tap the ‘Roadside’ icon in the top left and follow the prompts on the screen.
    3. Answer the series of questions regarding your incident to help Metromile determine what type of assistance you need.
    4. That’s it! As soon as you complete the prompts, someone is dispatched and help is on the way.

 
 

  • Use your online dashboard. The Metromile online dashboard really is the one-stop shop for all things policy-related. And it’s also another easy way to request roadside assistance by following these simple steps:

 

    1. Navigate to the dashboard either online or via the Metromile app.
    2. Click the ‘Claims’ tab on the top navigation bar.
    3. From there, click ‘Request Roadside Assistance’ in the right-hand menu.
    4. Follow the prompts to determine the kind of help you need, and sit back until someone arrives.

 

  1. Call Metromile roadside assistance. Not into navigating menus or typing out your answers? No problem. It’s ridiculously easy to request roadside assistance with a quick call — just dial 1-800-983-3400 and someone will be out to help you in a snap.

 
Still have questions about the value of roadside assistance or any of the other features Metromile customers love? Visit the Help Center for answers to some of the most frequently asked questions, and if you’re not a Metromile customer yet, get your free quote today.

The Best Spots to Catch a Flick In Your Car on National Drive-In Movie Day

 
Some old school practices have thankfully fallen by the wayside (think: having to hang up the house phone every time you used the internet). But other outdated customs are thankfully experiencing something of a renaissance. Case in point: drive-in movies. Believe it or not, June 6 is National Drive-in Movie Day, and whether you miss the fun of catching flicks from your front seat, or you’ve never had the pleasure of pulling up to an outdoor cinema, now is the perfect time to grab some popcorn and put the car in park for a nostalgic adventure.

Here are eight must-visit drive-in theaters for Metromile customers to enjoy:
 

  1. West Wind Capitol Drive-In, San Jose, CA. This truly retro Northern California landmark first opened in 1952, and the family-friendly facility also features playgrounds, arcades, and of course, supremely stocked snack bars. There’s nothing antiquated about West Wind’s technology, though —the fully-digital drive-in features state-of-the-art digital projectors and screens that are way bigger than typical indoor theatres.

 

  1. Harvest Moon Twin Drive-In, Gibson City, IL. This sweet venue about two hours south of Chicago invites guests to sit out, grill, and have a good time Friday through Sunday nights from Memorial Day through August 9th.

 

  1. Delsea Drive-In Movie Theatre, Vineland, NJ. Built in 1949, closed in 1987, and reopened in 2004, the Delsea Drive-In is New Jersey’s only drive-in movie theatre (although RIchard Hollingshead opened the very first one in America here in 1933). The facility is open from Memorial Day weekend through Labor Day on Thursdays, Fridays, Saturdays, and Sundays.

 

  1. 99W Drive-In Theater, Newberg, OR. The 99W Drive-IN has been through a lot: its first screen was lost in the Columbus Day Storm of 1962 and its second screen lasted until another storm knocked it down in 1990. But now, the site is one of a few remaining drive-ins in Oregon, open from late April/early May through late October.

 

  1. Shankweiler’s Drive-In Theater, Orefield, PA. This is it: the oldest remaining drive-in theater in America! Shankweiler’s has been in continuous operation since 1934. Nowadays, the theater has a modern vibe, with HD Digital technology and high-quality sound equipment.

 

  1. Park Place Drive-In Theater, Marion, VA. Built in 1954 and operated until 1983, the Park Place Drive-In went dark for nearly two decades and was then resurrected to be bigger and better in 2000. It’s still going strong today.

 

  1. Auto-Vue Drive-In Theatre, Colville, WA. The state has just a few drive-in theaters left, and this one has been serving customers since 1953.

 

  1.  West Wind Drive-In, Glendale, AZ. Another West Wind location locals love is in Glendale, AZ. Like other West Wind drive-ins, this one hosts fun events like pajama parties and Customer Appreciation Night when all movies are free!    

 
Ready for some drive-in nostalgia but need to make sure you’re insured first? Visit metromile.com today to get your free quote.